Trench Art

Letter openers made from cartridges

Letter openers made from cartridges

Trench Art is the name given to objects manufactured by both soldiers and civilians from shell casings, bullets, shrapnel and miscellaneous battlefield debris, and is predominantly associated with World War I (1914 – 18). The most common material used for trench art is brass shell casings, which, once decorated, can be utilised as vases. Other metal items include cigarette cases, lighters, ashtrays, and cast model aeroplanes. Often the items will bear an inscription such as the name of a French village or theatre of war and engraved decoration or embossing. Another softer form of trench art is embroidered and painted textiles. Also produced by civilians and soldiers (needlework was considered good therapy for those convalescing in nursing homes), these textiles range from silk postcards to large pictures and wall hangings, often featuring regimental crests.

Information from www.carters.com.au

Shell cartridge inscribed with a dragon

Shell cartridge inscribed with a dragon

Vases

Vases

Ashtray

Ashtray

Ashtray

Ashtray

Tobacco tin

Tobacco tin

This unique Tobacco tin was made by a soldier from the 2nd/28th Battalion whilst training on the Atherton Tablelands near Cairns in QLD during WWII. It is possibly made from a bully beef* tin with the Rising Sun badge and Australia insignia soldered on the lid.

*Bully beef
The modern day version of bully beef is corned beef. Its name is derived from the French "bouilli de boeuf" or boiled beef. It was made with beef, gelatine and salt. 

Information from www.smh.com.au

 

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